Illness

Aspiration Above Illness

By John Diamond, M.D.

A doctor friend informs me that he has had three episodes of cancer. He is taking all the usual preventive measures to not have a fourth, but he wonders if there is something else I can do to help him.

So I ask him what really matters in his life. There are four areas, he responds: caring for his chronically ill wife, his practice, his teaching – and photography. Which one of the four makes him feel most loved, and therefore most loving? Not surprisingly, it is his photography. This is his Highest activity. This is the one that brings him closest to God (however he defines It).

This is his Aspiration. All his acts of creativity, all his four areas, should be. But for him, and for everyone, there is always one which is the most immediately Aspirational, which he can then generalize into all areas of his life – including his self-healing. There is always one to be found (but it may require some work to find it), and, tragically, it is usually only one. But that one is there. Always.

The state of Aspiration is so important for a full life, a life of Gratitude for the Oneness of the physical world and the World of Spirit. And this is especially important in cases of cancer. I always seek the Aspirational activity, particularly with cancer.

Like all diseases, the cause of cancer is multi-factorial, but, from my point of view, the central factor is always the loss of Aspiration.[1] I am so pleased – and privileged – to be working with my friend not on his disease but on his photography. And I smile as he smiles when he Embraces Life through it.

Thank you, my friend.

And thank You for my Aspirational activity being to help him with his.


[1] John Diamond, M.D., The Psychopathology of Cancer. Ridgefield, CT: Enhancement Books, 2005.